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Sweden 2016 "Animals and plants from the Palace of Nature" 

Issue Date 14.01.20016
ID Michel:  Scott:  Stanley Gibbons:  Yvert:   UPU:  N/A Category: pR
Author Eva Wilsson, Lars Sjööblom (E), Piotr Naszarkowski (E)
Stamps in set 5
Value BREV = Domestic letter of 20gr
Maiasaura
flower Queen Silvia
Mammoth
Quagga
Hydroporus figuratus
Size (width x height)  36.6x26.5 mm
Layout booklet of  10 stamps
Products FDC x1 MC x5
Paper  
Perforation none
Print Technique Offset, 4 colours
Printed by  
Quantity  N/A
Issuing Authority
prehistoric animals and plants on stamp of Sweden 2016

On January 14, 2016 Post Authority of Sweden issued a set of 5 stamps: Animals and plants from the Palace of Nature".  Stamps issued in a booklet of 10.  The Swedish Museum of Natural History  celebrate its centennial in the building that is sometimes called the Palace of Nature. It is home to the outcome of the curiosity and thirst for knowledge demonstrated by men and women throughout the years.
The Swedish Museum of Natural History  The decision to construct the building that would house the Swedish Museum of Natural History in Frescati (Inspired by his trip to Italy in the 1780s, King Gustaf III named several areas in northern Stockholm after places in Italy) in northern Stockholm was made in 1901. The idea was that Frescati would become a center of science, and the museum a jewel in the crown of the Royal Swedish Academy. The museum and several other buildings were constructed over the period 1907–1916 based on drawings by architect Axel Anderberg, who also designed the Royal Swedish Academy’s building. The museum’s main building was built to be a monument and has its roots in the Baroque period as well as powerful, geometric Art Nouveau. The facades were dressed in dark red brick. The wings that extend from the main building were initially home to the museum’s departments at that time, zoology, paleontology and geology. The botanical department was given a separate building. In its early days, the museum did not have electric lighting and the buildings were therefore equipped with large, tall windows to allow daylight to shine on the exhibitions. Over the years, the Swedish Museum of Natural History has been expanded via underground chambers to store its extensive collections. Cosmonova, the museum’s combined planetarium and domed movie theater, was opened in 1992 in a separate building connected to the main building.
The museum is Sweden’s largest, and it contains more than ten million fossils, animals, plants, fungi and minerals. The stamp motifs depict a representative sample from the collections.
Maiasaura, dinosaur on stamp of Sweden 2016
The newly hatched dinosaur, a Maiasaura, is a reconstruction of a 75 million-year-old fossil found in the USA. Fossils from the nest and eggs were also found at the site. In the background is today’s royal fern (Osmunda regalis), a plant that has more or less remained the same since the dinosaurs roamed the Earth.


prehistoric flower Silvianthemum suecicum on stamp of Sweden 2016
 The evolution of flowers has been mapped by the museum’s own researchers. This flower is an 80 million-year-old fossil that was found in Skåne and named after Queen Silvia (Silvianthemum suecicum). With the flower are shown highly magnified pollen grains from the dandelion, masur birch and amaranth.


Mammoth on stamp of Sweden 2016
 Researchers at the Swedish Museum of Natural History were the first in the world to map the mammoth’s entire heritage, thanks to the discovery of a Siberian mammoth. However, the mystery behind why the mammoth as a species died out approximately 4,000 years ago has still not been fully explained.
 quagga on stamp of Sweden 2016 
This fetus of a quagga (Equus quagga quagga) was brought home from South Africa in 1775 by Anders Sparrman, one of Linné’s students. The fetus is invaluable since the quagga, which is a relative of the zebra, is extinct today. The motif also depicts the museum’s large dome, which the visitor can see from the entrance hall.
Hydroporus figuratus bug on stamp of Sweden 2016 
 This predaceous diving beetle (Hydroporus figuratus) was described in 1826 by Leonard Gyllenhaal, insect researcher and student of Linné. Other researchers believed that Gyllenhaal’s discovery was simply a known beetle with different coloring, but more recent DNA research has shown that it is its own species. In the background is a diatom.



Products

FDC (inside text here) Maxi Cards
*EUROPA 2016 - Think Green stamp (issued on the same day) includen on FDC, Collector's Sheet and Maxi Cards set
prehistoric and modern animals on FDC of Sweden 2016 prehistoric and modern animals on maxi cards of Sweden 2016
Collector's Sheet   The booklet
prehistoric and modern animals on collector's sheet of Sweden 2016 prehistoric and modern animals on stamps of Sweden 2016
Used covers
Mammoth on stamp of Sweden 2016 Dinosaur Maiasaura  on stamp of Sweden 2016
  

References:  Bulletin (Stamp News magazine)

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