<prev

back to index

next>>


Liechtenstein 2016 "Archaeological finds in Liechtenstein: Utensils" 

Issue Date 09.03.2016
ID Michel:  Scott:  Stanley Gibbons:  Yvert:   UPU:   Category: pR
Designer Sven Beham, Ruggell
Stamps in set 3
Value CHF 1.00 - Dagger (flint tool)
CHF 1.50 - Razor
CHF 2.00 -
Winged axe
Size (width x height) 48 x 28 mm,  sheet size 208 x 146 mm
Layout Sheet of 16 stamps
Products FDC x4
Paper Special stamp paper PVA,
102 g/m2, gummed
Perforation 13.25 x 13.25
Print Technique 4-colour offset, FM screening, silver hot-foil stamping,
multiheight embossing
Printed by Cartor Security Printing Meaucé la Loupe
Quantity
Issuing Authority Liechtensteinische Post AG
Archaeological finds in Liechtenstein on stamps from 2016

On March  9,  Post of Liechtenstein issued  a set of 3 stamps shows some archeology treasure of the country. The multi-part stamp series of archaeological finds in Liechtenstein shows three utensils in this issue. 

Archaeological finds in Liechtenstein: Utensils on stamps from 2016

The dagger  was made of flint, prehistoric man’s steel, in the Neolithic period (4th century B.C.). Experts assume that it was imported from Monti Lessini at Lake Garda by people belonging to the Horgen culture who lived on the Schellenberg-Borscht site. The lancet-shaped blade which has a broken-off tip is eleven centimetres long and the organic handle is missing. The dagger is important evidence of the trade relations that were conducted over long distances by the Neolithic inhabitants of the Alpine Rhine Valley.

Razor on stamp of Liechtenstein 2016 Winged axe on stamp of Liechtenstein 2016 The razor (left) dates back to the late Bronze Age (12th century B.C.) and was discovered as an individual find in a piece of woodlands in the municipality of Vaduz. Its large blade and oval, frame handle with an end ring are characteristic features of such utensils.

The winged axe (right) from the Hallstatt period (5th century B.C.) is made of bronze. It was discovered in around 1920 whilst cutting peat in the Ruggeller Riet. The two wings and the eyelet serve to fix the blade to the wooden handle that no longer exists.
The multi-part stamp series of archaeological finds in Liechtenstein shows three utensils in this issue. The dagger (face value: CHF 1.00) was made of flint, prehistoric man’s steel, in the Neolithic period (4th century B.C.). Experts assume that it was imported from Monti Lessini at Lake Garda by people belonging to the Horgen culture who lived on the Schellenberg-Borscht site. The lancet-shaped blade which has a broken-off tip is eleven centimetres long and the organic handle is missing. The dagger is important evidence of the trade relations that were conducted over long distances by the Neolithic inhabitants of the Alpine Rhine Valley.
The razor (face value: CHF 1.50) dates back to the late Bronze Age (12th century B.C.) and was discovered as an individual find in a piece of woodlands in the municipality of Vaduz. Its large blade and oval, frame handle with an end ring are characteristic features of such utensils. The winged axe (face value: CHF 2.00) from the Hallstatt period (5th century B.C.) is made of bronze. It was discovered in around 1920 whilst cutting peat in the Ruggeller Riet. The two wings and the eyelet serve to fix the blade to the wooden handle that no longer exists.

Products

Mini Sheet Maxi Cards (back sides of all three cards are identical)
Archaeological finds in Liechtenstein on stamps from 2016
Archaeological finds in Liechtenstein: Utensils on Maxi Cards from 2016
FDC sent at the day of stamps issue
Archaeological finds in Liechtenstein: Utensils on used FDC from 2016Archaeological finds in Liechtenstein: Utensils on used FDC from 2016
Used covers
Archaeological finds in Liechtenstein: Utensils on used FDC from 2016
  

References:    News brochure Liechtensteins's Post: Stamp issue 7 March 2016  (pages 11-12) , Website Liechtensteins's Post

<prev

back to index

next>

PaleoPhilatelie.eu logo
PageRank Checking Icon

Valid HTML 4.01 Transitional

  paleophilatelie.eu Webutation


Latest update 18.04.2016

Any feedback, comments or even complaints are welcome: admin@paleophilatelie.eu (you can email me on ENglish, DEutsch, or RUssian)