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Slovenia  2014 "Discovery of  sea-horse fossil at Kamnik–Savinja Alps, Slovenia"

Issue Date 20.04.2014
ID Michel:  (frame)  Stanley Gibbons:    UPU:  Category: pR
Author Photograph:   Mr. Hitij.  
Special Cancel - made by DATA PRINT d.o.o. Kamnik
Stamps in set 1
Value A   -  fossil of  sea-horse (Hippocampus sarmaticus)
* A - standard letter inside country - 0,29 EUR
Size (width x height)
Layout sheets of 25 stamps
Variations FDC x 1 
Paper self adhesive
Perforation
Print Technique
Printed by OSNOVNA SOLA FRANA ALBREHTA
Quantity stamps: 250, FDC: 100
Issuing Authority Philatelic Club Ivan Vavpotic Kamnik , Slovenia
stamp of Slovenia 2014 - Discovery of sea-horse fossil at Kamnik–Savinja Alps

On April 20 2014, Philatelic Club Ivan Vavpotic Kamnik, Slovenia issued commemorative self-adhesive stamp.  The stamp is based on  photo of discovered fossil made by mr. Hitij and shows fossil of  sea horse - the oldest sea-horse found to date. The fossil was uncovered in April 2009 at Kamnik-Savinja Alps  by  two Slovenian paleontologists ( Jure Žalohar  and TomazÿHitij ) from Slovenia's University of Ljubljana who were originally investigating fossil insects in this area, so finding the fossil seahorses was "completely unexpected," they said. Jure Žalohar  first spotted a fossil in the water as he was washing his hands in a stream after a jog.
  
x
Researchers TomazÿHitij (left) and Jure Žalohar (right) investigate plates of gray siltstone
fossil of Hippocampus sarmaticus

Hippocampus sarmaticus
Hippocampus sarmaticus   ("Hippos" means horse while "kampos" means sea monster.), this 13-million-year-old baby seahorse fossil, with a head measuring just 5 millimeters  long, is among the oldest seahorse fossils ever discovered.  Earlier seahorses likely lived in the temperate shallow coastal waters of the passageway between Europe and Africa that linked the Atlantic with the Indian Ocean until about 15 million years ago, the researchers say. That passageway would have helped the fish slowly spread around the globe.
They probably dwelled in dense beds of sea grass, where food such as small crustaceans was abundant. The seahorses' black flecks would have camouflaged them in the vegetation, which the fish also likely anchored themselves to using their prehensile tails.  The new finds suggest that the fish could have held onto floating clumps of sea grass for weeks or months with their prehensile tails. If caught in a current, these rafts of sea grass may have carried the seahorses as far as 260 kilometers  in a month, possibly explaining how the poor swimmers were able to spread around the globe.
  

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FDC  Sheet
Slovenian FDC 2014 with stamp of Discovery of sea-horse fossil at Kamnik–Savinja Alps Slovenia 2014, sheet of stamps - Discovery of sea-horse fossil at Kamnik–Savinja Alps
Circulated cover and Circulated FDC
circulated cover with stamps of Slovenia 2014 - Discovery of sea-horse fossil at Kamnik–Savinja Alps Slovenian circulated FDC 2014 with stamp of Discovery of sea-horse fossil at Kamnik–Savinja Alps

 
Acknowledgement:  



Reference:    Izvestia.ru  Wikipedia  Scientific Illustration    National Geographics News

    

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